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Who is Scott Blauvelt? Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended

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After repeatedly exposing himself and masturbating behind the wheel in Ohio, one lawyer has had his license revoked.

According to the court’s decision, Scott Blauvelt, a 50-year-old lawyer who obtained his license in 1997, was suspended by the Ohio Supreme Court on Thursday for an undetermined period of time.

Blauvelt has worked as Butler County’s assistant prosecutor as well as Hamilton’s city prosecutor.

According to the Supreme Court, police pulled over the lawyer while he was driving five times while unclothed. In a previous opinion, it was also mentioned that in 2006, when Blauvelt served as the city prosecutor of Hamilton, security cameras caught him in the building where the prosecutor’s office was located while he was naked after hours.

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The city fired him despite the fact that his public indecency charge at the time was dropped due to a swift trial infraction.

After being stopped for a traffic violation in 2018, Blauvelt was previously suspended for two years in 2020. He was charged with three more counts of public indecency for showing his naked body to other drivers throughout the first seven months of that suspension. During two of these instances, he was also masturbating.

The lawyer admitted to “additional similar episodes of public obscenity for which he was not detained,” the court said, and pleaded guilty to all of the accusations.

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Blauvelt began a two-year treatment in May 2021 to address his “compulsive sexual-behavior illness.” He goes to weekly psychotherapy sessions and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous meetings, a 12-step program for treating sexual addiction. For his identified bipolar condition, he also visits a psychiatrist.

He had “expressed true contrition for his crimes,” the court noted, but he lacked a medical prognosis that would have indicated when he might competently and morally resume his legal practice.